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Location, Location, Location

Auto-posted during The Ultimate Planes Trains & Automobiles Trip.

There are more than a few authors and thinkers who are happy to proclaim that we are now living in a truly virtual world. According to them, people can live wherever they want, work wherever they want, and thanks to the internet, commerce can take place instantly around the globe. One's location, it seems, matters less than ever.

To that I say: False. Such claims are almost laughable in their absurdity.

Look at the rise in popularity of mobile apps like Foursquare and other silly social media tools that allow people broadcast their whereabouts to the world. Or how about Twitter's new feature that attaches the location of the neighborhood where a person sends each tweet? If we truly lived in a locationless world, nobody would use these things. But they do, and that speaks volumes.

(from Flickr user Irish Typepad)

If you've ever gone apartment hunting on Craigslist, you may have noticed a common theme across many postings. Every rental property on the market is 'close' to something. No landlord wants to post an advertisement for a property that is far away from shopping, restaurants, employment centers, etc. Of course, many of the advertisements fail to disclose the address of the property, much less describe the location in objective, verifiable metrics. Instead, these postings read something like: 10 minutes to downtown! or 5 minutes to such-and-such university! The 'time distance' is almost always exaggerated and usually farther away than it really is. If location didn't matter, the landlords would exclusively hype the quality of the interiors, or the kitchen appliances. Those things often seem of secondary importance.

Location still matters, don't let anyone try to convince you otherwise. If anything, the internet amd technology has made location more important than ever. The proof is all around us.


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